Parking in Reading - APCOA Parking
 
 
 
 
 

Parking in Reading with APCOA

Searching for a car park in Reading? Choose from the location list below and find a suitable car park today.

Goring & Streatley Station

Open all day

Per day From 3,10 £
Reading Station

Open all day

Per hour From 4 £

APCOA operates three car parks in and around Reading, serving Reading Train Station, Pangbourne Station, and the Reading Travelodge. Our car parks in Reading are convenient for entertainment, shopping, and food—as well as major transport links and some surprisingly green spaces. 

 

Reading is much more than a satellite town to London. Historical and commercially important, Reading combines a thriving business infrastructure with pockets of beauty. Visit the Forbury Gardens and Abbey Ruins (8 minutes from Reading Train Station) for some respite from the bustle of the city centre. You’ll discover a pleasantly landscaped garden in the grounds of the old Abbey, the ruins of which still stand. Forbury Gardens also contain the Maiwand Lion, a cast-iron sculpture commemorating local soldiers who lost their lives in the Second Anglo-Afghan War (1878-1880). 

 

Reading’s Hexagon Theatre, which hosts big gigs, plays, and stand-up shows, is a 15-minute walk from the Reading Train Station car park. Book early for popular events! 

 

For shopping, eating, and movies, head to the Reading Oracle. 15 minutes on foot from our Reading Train Station car park, the Oracle contains a 10-screen cinema, more than 80 stores, and a huge selection of riverside cafes, bars, and restaurants.

 

Further afield, both Beale Park Wildlife Park and Gardens and the National Trust’s Basildon Park are accessible from our Pangbourne Station location. Beale Park is a great place to take the kids: the Park is home to dozens of furry friends including meerkats, otters, monkeys, and alpacas. Basildon Park combines a spectacular restoration of a Georgian mansion with walking trails in 400 acres of mature parkland. Inside, the house is a time capsule, which pays homage to the 1950s (the area in which it was restored) as well as the building’s 18th-century roots. There’s also a National Trust cafe.